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MONTHLY BRIEFINGS - Sep 2017

September 2017 Briefing - Critical Care

Mon, Oct 2, 2017

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Critical Care for September 2017. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Embezzlement Widespread in Medical Practices

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Embezzlement is widespread among medical practices, and knowing the warning signs is helpful for preventing it, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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End-Stage Renal Disease Patients' Readmission Rate High

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly a quarter of hospital admissions among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis (HD) have a subsequent 30-day unplanned readmission, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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More Than 78 Percent of Health Care Personnel Receive Flu Shot

THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than 78 percent of health care personnel (HCP) and 53.6 percent of pregnant women received influenza vaccination during the 2016-2017 influenza season, according to two studies published in the Sept. 29 issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Optimal Length of Post-Op Opioid Pain Medication Rx Identified

THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The optimal length of opioid pain medication prescription after common surgical procedures lies between the observed median prescription length and the early nadir, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in JAMA Surgery.

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Working With a Scribe Improves Physician Satisfaction

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Working with a scribe significantly improves physicians' overall satisfaction, satisfaction with chart quality and accuracy, and charting efficiency, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Cancer Risk Up for RA Patients With Venous Thromboembolism

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) have increased risk of cancer in the first year after VTE and during a longer follow-up period, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Low-Dose Oxygen No Benefit in Adults With Acute Stroke

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The prophylactic use of low-dose oxygen does not reduce death or disability at three months among patients with acute stroke, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Blame Common in Patient Safety Incident Reports

TUESDAY, Sept. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Blame is a common element in family practice patient safety incident reports, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Private Vehicle Transport Cuts Death After Penetrating Injury

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with gunshot or stab wounds, private vehicle transport is associated with significantly lower likelihood of death than emergency medical services (EMS) transport, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in JAMA Surgery.

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Worker Contribution to Health Benefits Up in 2017

MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In 2017, health benefits coverage remained stable, while workers faced considerable variation in costs, according to a report published online Sept. 19 in Health Affairs.

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Diabetes Insipidus Can Occur After Stopping Vasopressin

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although rare, diabetes insipidus (DI) can occur following discontinuation of vasopressin infusion for septic shock, according to a case study published online Sept. 11 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy & Therapeutics.

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Fasting Blood Glucose Trajectory May Predict Future MI

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals without diabetes, certain fasting blood glucose (FBG) trajectories are associated with the risk of future myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Diabetes Care.

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Insurer Market Power Lowers Providers' Prices

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Insurers have the bargaining power to reduce provider prices in highly concentrated provider markets, according to a report published in the September issue of Health Affairs.

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Attempts to Prevent Tongue Swallowing Hinder Resuscitation

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For athletes with cardiac arrest, attempts to prevent tongue swallowing are an obstacle to resuscitation, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in HeartRhythm.

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Type 2 Myocardial Infarction Definition Impacts Prognosis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Definition of type 2 myocardial infarction (T2MI) using a method that does not require the presence of coronary artery disease is associated with a lower event-related mortality rate, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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ACP Does Not Support Legalization of Assisted Suicide

TUESDAY, Sept. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Physicians (ACP) does not support the legalization of physician-assisted suicide, a practice that raises ethical, clinical, and other concerns, according to a position paper published online Sept. 19 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Physicians Tweeting About Drugs May Have Conflict of Interest

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most physicians on Twitter with a financial conflict of interest (FCOI) and frequent tweets mention specific drugs for which they have a conflict, according to a study published in the September issue of The Lancet Haematology.

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Hospital Quality Independently Impacts Readmission Rates

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital quality contributes to readmission rates independent of factors involving patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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EHR Data May Beat Claims Data in Assessing Sepsis Incidence

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Sepsis is present in 6 percent of adult hospitalizations, with no change in incidence from 2009 to 2014 based on electronic health record (EHR) data in contrast to claims-based analyses, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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'Science Spin' Found Prevalent in Biomedical Literature

FRIDAY, Sept. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Spin in biomedical literature (also referred to as "science hype") is prevalent, with trials having the highest and greatest variability in the prevalence of spin, according to a review published online Sept. 11 in PLOS Biology.

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Some Aspects of Empathy Improve During Medical Training

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain aspects of empathy improve during medical student training, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in Medical Education.

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Are Physicians Obligated to Help on Planes?

TUESDAY, Sept. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Does being a physician carry a moral obligation to respond to calls for medical assistance on airplanes? That is the topic of an article published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Chronic Dosing of Apricot Kernel Extract May Lead to Hypoxia

TUESDAY, Sept. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic dosing of apricot kernel extract can result in hypoxia and cyanide toxicity, according to a report published online Sept. 11 in BMJ Case Reports.

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Antibiotic Rx Adherence Varies Widely in Sickle Cell Care

TUESDAY, Sept. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to antibiotic guidelines for acute chest syndrome (ACS) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) varies widely, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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'Modest at Best' Discriminatory Ability for CBC Test in Infants

MONDAY, Sept. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Complete blood cell count parameters at commonly used or optimal thresholds do not offer high accuracy in identifying invasive bacterial infections (IBIs) in febrile infants (≤60 days of age), according to a study published online Sept. 11 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Zoonotic Chlamydia caviae Tied to Community-Acquired Pneumonia

FRIDAY, Sept. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Three cases of community-acquired pneumonia involving Chlamydia caviae after exposure to ill guinea pigs have been described, according to a research letter published online Sept. 6 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Budget Cuts Threaten Research on Antimicrobial Resistance

THURSDAY, Sept. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Proposed budget cuts could seriously hamper efforts to address antimicrobial resistance (AMR), according to an article published online Sept. 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Care Process Use Linked to Reduced S. Aureus Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Use of evidence-based care processes in routine care for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is associated with reduced mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Docs Should Be Aware of Family Beliefs Regarding Nondisclosure

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should be aware of societal codes of conduct that affect family beliefs and behaviors regarding information disclosure to pediatric patients, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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More Research Needed for Vitamin D's Cardiac Effect in PCI

TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More research is needed to assess the role of vitamin D in the prevention of periprocedural myocardial injury, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Electronic Alert Doesn't Up Appropriate Thromboprophylaxis

FRIDAY, Sept. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A computer-based alert system with a Geneva Risk Score calculation tool in the electronic patient chart does not improve appropriate thromboprophylaxis in patients admitted to general medical wards, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Peri-Op Management Key in Surgical Resident Malpractice

FRIDAY, Sept. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The perioperative period appears critical in malpractice cases involving surgical residents, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in JAMA Surgery.

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