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February 2018 Briefing - Orthopedics

Thu, Mar 1, 2018

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for February 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Early Studies Often Show Exaggerated Treatment Effect

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Trials to evaluate drugs or devices used to treat chronic medical conditions that are published early in the chain of evidence often show an exaggerated treatment effect compared with subsequent trials, according to research published online Feb. 21 in the Mayo Clinical Proceedings.

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Recommendations for Optimizing Hidden Curriculum in Medicine

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In a position paper published online Feb. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians (ACP) presents recommendations for optimizing clinical learning environments by fostering a positive hidden curriculum in medicine.

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Understanding Rx Nonadherence Can Improve Adherence

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Understanding nonadherence in patients and encouraging a change in attitude toward patients and their medication can improve medication adherence, according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Knee Pain, Functional Impairment Associated With Depression

MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Knee pain and functional impairments in elderly individuals are associated with the development of depressive symptoms, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Artificial Intelligence May Help Prevent Physician Burnout

FRIDAY, Feb. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Artificial intelligence (AI), in which computers can be trained to recognize patterns in large quantities of data, may be able to reduce physicians' burdens, saving them time and energy, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Menopausal Hormone Therapy Tied to Less Pronounced Kyphosis

FRIDAY, Feb. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Menopausal hormone therapy (HT) use is associated with less pronounced kyphosis compared with never-use, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Menopause.

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CDC: No Change in Percentage of Uninsured in U.S. From '16 to '17

THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of uninsured U.S. persons of all ages did not change significantly from 2016 to the first nine months of 2017, according to a report published online Feb. 22 by the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Aspirin, Rivaroxaban Similar After Total Hip, Knee Arthroplasty

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who have undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty, extended prophylaxis with aspirin does not differ significantly from rivaroxaban for venous thromboembolism prevention, according to a study published in the Feb. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lumbopelvic Pain Negatively Affects Walking in Elderly

TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lumbopelvic pain (LPP) is common in well-functioning older adults, according to a study published Feb. 7 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Burnout Found Prevalent Among Doctors in Single Health System

TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout is prevalent among physicians, affecting over one-third of physicians in a single health system, and is associated with health care delivery, according to a research letter published online Feb. 19 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Hydroxychloroquine No Better Than Placebo for Hand OA

TUESDAY, Feb. 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with moderate-to-severe hand pain and radiographic osteoarthritis, hydroxychloroquine is no more effective than placebo for relieving pain, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Long-Term Inhaled Corticosteroid Use May Raise Fracture Risk

FRIDAY, Feb. 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term, high-dose use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) is associated with a modest increase in the risk of hip and upper extremity fractures in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published in the February issue of CHEST.

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Patients Want Physicians to Have Greater Connectivity

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients want greater connectivity, online tools and text messaging, as well as more time with their physicians, according to a report published in Medical Economics.

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Ultra-Processed Food Linked to Increased Overall Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of ultra-processed food is associated with increased risk of overall and breast cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in The BMJ.

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AAP, POSNA Release 5 Pediatric Orthopedic Recommendations

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As part of the Choosing Wisely campaign, the American Academy of Pediatrics and Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America have released a list of five orthopedic tests and procedures that are commonly ordered but are not always necessary for treatment of children with certain musculoskeletal conditions.

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Opioids Plus Acetaminophen, Ketorolac Cost-Effective Post-Sx

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous acetaminophen with or without ketorolac is associated with reduced opioid consumption and cost of care after scoliosis surgery in adolescents, compared with opioids alone, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

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New Tool Measures Impact of Brachial Plexus Injury

THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A new questionnaire can measure the impact of brachial plexus injury (BPI) and assess surgical outcomes, according to a study published in the Feb. 7 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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New Model Stratifies Patients With Long Bone Metastases

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A model with four categories has been developed to stratify patients with symptomatic long bone metastases (LBM) based on their expected survival, according to an article published online Feb. 7 in the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Four Best Practices Outlined to Prevent Health Care Cyberattacks

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Four best practices outlined that can help prevent health care cyberattacks, which increased from 2016 to 2017, according to a report published in Managed Healthcare Executive.

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Risk Tool Predicts Pressure Injuries in Hospitalized Children

TUESDAY, Feb. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Braden QD Scale reliably predicts both immobility-related and device-related pressure injuries in hospitalized pediatric patients, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Pediatrics.

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Limited Evidence for Effect of Cranial Electrical Stimulation

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence for the effectiveness of cranial electrical stimulation (CES) is sparse, according to a review published online Feb. 13 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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EHRs Not Sufficient to Ensure Success in Value-Based Care

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) are not sufficient to ensure success in value-based care, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

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Top Consumer Concerns Reported About Physicians

FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Health care consumers have four major concerns regarding their physicians, according to a report published by Managed Healthcare Executive.

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Poll: Personal Beliefs Shouldn't Allow Doctors to Refuse to Treat

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most people do not believe that professionals including health care providers should be allowed to refuse to provide services based on their conscience or beliefs, according to a recent HealthDay/The Harris Poll.

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FDA Says U.S. Will Now Produce Critical MRI Component

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A long-feared shortage of a substance used in millions of medical imaging procedures each year in the United States appears to have been avoided, federal officials report.

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Expenditures Rising for Treating Obesity-Related Illness in U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The amount of U.S. health care resources devoted to treating obesity-related illness in U.S. adults rose 29 percent from 2001 to 2015, according to a review published in the January issue of Clinical Chemistry.

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Possible Link Found Between Poor Diet and Back Injuries

TUESDAY, Feb. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A high advanced glycation end product (H-AGE) diet is associated with decreased vertebral microstructure, mechanical behaviors, and fracture resistance in young female mice, according to a study published recently in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Opioid Prescribing Trends in the VA Similar to Other Settings

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid prescribing trends in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) from 2010 to 2016 followed similar trajectories as non-VHA settings, peaking around 2012 then declining, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Humanities Exposure Positively Impacts Medical Students

MONDAY, Feb. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to the humanities correlates with less burnout and higher levels of positive personal qualities among medical students, according to a study published online Jan. 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Factors Identified That Impact Physicians IT Adoption

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have considerable concerns about the efficacy and evidence base of health information technology (IT), according to a report published by the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Medicaid Expansion Cuts Out-of-Pocket Spending

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- States that expanded Medicaid cut the probability of non-elderly near-poor adults being uninsured and lowered average out-of-pocket spending, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Health Affairs.

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Home Discharge After Joint Surgery OK for Those Living Alone

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Patients living alone can have a safe and manageable recovery when discharged directly home after total joint arthroplasty, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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NSAID Users Commonly Exceed Daily Limit

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The number of users who exceed the daily limit of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is "nontrivial," according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety.

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Persistent Pain Common 1 Month After Elective Pediatric Surgery

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many pediatric patients have persistent pain after common ambulatory surgeries, according to a study published online Jan. 20 in Pediatric Anesthesia.

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