Tooth Root in the Maxillary Sinus
Tooth Root in the Maxillary Sinus
March 21, 2016 by Kevin M. Rice, MD

 

Sinus Pain after Dental Work • Xray of the Week 2016 • Week #5

 

The accidental displacement of a root into the maxillary sinus is a recognized complication of exodontia. Such roots should normally be removed early rather than late in order to minimize the likelihood of maxillary sinus complications. In some cases, the sinus cavity can be irrigated with saline (antral lavage) and the tooth fragment may be brought back to the site of the opening through which it entered the sinus, and may be retrievable. At other times, a window must be made into the sinus in the Canine fossa--a procedure referred to as "Caldwell-Luc". A root left within the maxillary sinus may, on occasion, pass spontaneously into the nose.

Left image: Coronal CT of sinuses showing the empty right maxillary second molar tooth socket. (Tooth #2) and a portion of the tooth root in the right maxillary sinus.

 

Right image: Axial CT of sinuses showing a portion of the tooth root (tooth #2) in the right maxillary sinus. There is also bilateral maxillary sinus mucosal thickening.

Coronal CT of sinuses showing the empty right maxillary second molar tooth socket. (Tooth #2)

Coronal CT of sinuses showing the empty right maxillary second molar tooth socket. (Tooth #2) and a portion of the tooth root in the right maxillary sinus.

Learn more about Neuroradiology from one of the world's leading experts, Dr. Blake A. Johnson at Imaging in Israel - 2017.

 

References:

 

Root in the maxillary sinus J.K. Barclay, M.D.S. (F.R.A.C.D.S.)University of Otago Otago, New Zealand.Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology. Volume 64, Issue 2, August 1987, Pages 162–164

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0030422087900831

 

(This post was originally published on The Global Radiology CME Blog http://www.globalradcme.com/#!global-radiology-cme-blog/czj6 )

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